The Ultimate Troubleshooting Guide


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 Please note:  This page is still very  much  work in progress.  It will continue to be updated frequently (I hope).  There are several .visopt files included on this page.  If you want to use them, make sure to right click and save target as… or save link as… otherwise you will get a screen with less than useful information if the link is just clicked.  Also, these .visopt files will probably be updated rather frequently so you may wish to re-download the .visopt files on occasion.

Ideal Settings for Day Rendering(s):

  • Please visit the V-Ray Quick Renderings Setup Page for .visopt presets and background imagery.  If you wish to work with your own scene, start with the links below.
  • Begin by downloading the following .visopt file(s)…
    • For Super High quality renderings use: [premium content]  Note: Right click and “Save Target As…”
      • This is a super high quality, slow rendering .visopt file.  It should be used for final renderings (and for when you have time or resources to do a large render).
      • You will need to adjust the physical camera exposure for your particular scene.  (See information about “my scene is too dark” or “my scene is too light” below.)
      • Important:  Each time you double the size of the rendering, you should decrease the Irradiance map min rate by 2 (this will result in a negative number) and the Irradiance map max rate by 2 (this will also result in a negative number.
    • For High quality renderings use: [premium content]  Note: Right click and “Save Target As…”
      • This is a reasonable compromise between quality and rendering time.  It uses a light cache secondary engine and an Irradiance Map primary engine.  There should be few light artifacts in the render.
      • It should be adjusted for interior lights as well as a V-Ray sun.  I would suggest assigning the Sky’s Sun (both in GI and Background areas) to your particular sun in the environment tab of the V-Ray Options.
      • You can take this .visopt one step further by assigning an HDRI background image for the GI & Background (again under the environment tab of the V-Ray Options.
      • To further reduce render time, uncheck the “Caustics On” checkbox in the Caustics tab of the V-Ray Options.
      • To determine final rendering size, decide the final image size (for example 11 x 17) and multiply each dimension by 300.  This will give you the size in pixels for the final rendering.  See sample table below:
        • Web Output/TV Output/Screen Output:
          • 1920 x 1080 preferred, 1280 x 720 acceptable.
        • Print Output:
          • 4 x 6 = 1200 x 1800
          • 8.5 x 11 = 2250 x 3300
          • 11 x 17 = 3300 x 5100
        • Important:  Each time you double the size of the rendering, you should decrease the Irradiance map min rate by 2 (this will result in a negative number) and the Irradiance map max rate by 2 (this will also result in a negative number.
    • For Low quality/Quick renderings use: [premium content]  Note: Right click and “Save Target As…”

Ideal Settings for Night Rendering(s):

  • Please visit the V-Ray Quick Renderings Setup Page for .visopt presets and background imagery.  If you wish to work with your own scene, start with the links below.

My Image is Too Dark:

  • When your image is too dark, the first thing to check is your physical camera shutter speed.  It should be set at about 200 for daytime renderings and 50 or less for night renderings.
  • Next, confirm your sun is on (is the layer off my mistake?)  You can check by typing “sellight” and reading what lights are selected.  If no directional light is added to the selection, you don’t have a sun in your scene.

My Image is Too Light:

  • First, try reducing the shutter speed of the physical camera.  If you go above 700 or so on your shutter speed, you should reduce the GI value to be 0.1 and then re-adjust your shutter speed on the physical camera.